HISTORIAN’S CORNER: JULY 2019, Pt.I

July 6th

HISTORIAN’S CORNER: July 6
Taliesin Preservation’s historian Keiran Murphy’s weekly round-up of noteworthy FLLW resources.

Postcard looking at the Hillside Home School complex for which Frank Lloyd Wright designed three buildings. Two are visible in the photo—one on the upper left and the other is to the right with slot windows. Run by Wright’s aunts from 1887-1915, the day and boarding school was a progressive, college preparatory for children aged 6-18. (Property: Randolph Henning. This postcard is also in Henning’s book, “Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin: Illustrated by Vintage Postcards.”)

TRENDING ONLINE

99 Percent Invisible

Experts on kindergarten discuss the ideas behind this educational model, its inventor and its influence around the world. Kindergarten affected art in the 20th century, Frank Lloyd Wright, his mother and his aunts whom started the Hillside Home School.

TALIESIN FELLOWSHIP/SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

An “Architectural Digest” piece about Usoniaa community including homes designed by Wright, along with Wright admirer Aaron Resnick and former Wright apprentice David Henken. architecturaldigest.com/story/usonia-ny-best-designed-small-town-in-the-us

WRIGHT BOOKS REGARDING JAPAN FOR YOUR LIBRARY (PART I OF II):

Frank Lloyd Wright and the Art of Japan: The Architect’s Other Passion,” by Julia Meech. Meech’s exploration of Wright’s interest in Japanese art came when she discovered how many Japanese woodblock prints the architect collected while working on the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo. She explains how he was a dealer in Japanese art as well as a consumer of it. The book is available at libraries and used bookstores.

“Frank Lloyd Wright and Japan: The Role of Traditional Japanese Art and Architecture in the Work of Frank Lloyd Wright,” by Kevin Nute. Nute closely examined how all of the aspects of Japanese art, culture, and aesthetics affected the architect. Available at libraries and used bookstores.

“The Frank Lloyd Wright Collection of Surimono,” by Joan Mirviss. Wright possessed 300 Surimonoprivately commissioned Japanese woodblock prints. These were discovered in his archives years after he died. This volume was created for the exhibit about the Surimono put on at the Phoenix Art Museum. Available at libraries and used bookstores.

“Frank Lloyd Wright’s Imperial Hotel,” by Cary James. This book recounts one of the most extensive commissions of Wright’s career, the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, that took almost eight years to complete. It also includes Wright’s designs related to furniture, rugs, and two sets of plate ware meant for use in the formal dining room and the “Cabaret” dining room. Available from libraries plus used and standard bookstores.